The last privacy bites of 2022

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The Privacy Newsletter
#010 - December 2022
Privacy bites you want to sink your teeth into.
This issue starts again with some news that we also cover in the privacy monthly blog post. If you happen to find good content we should add in the next issue, please email us.
What happened in the last month

On November 8, a Committee of inquiry of the European Parliament published a report on the use of spyware by European Governments, painting a drab picture of State surveillance. Shortly after the report was published, the European Data Protection Supervisor called for a general ban on military-grade spyware.
The German, Norwegian, and French DPA's cautioned against installing two State apps which are mandatory to attend the Qatar world cup, finding them highly invasive. The authorities went as far as to recommend the use of a burner phone.
Google agreed to pay a 391 million dollar settlement for deceptively tracking user location in a class action spanning 40 US States. Google also undertook to employ a clearer interface and provide users with additional information.
A lawsuit was filed against Apple in a California district Court over alleged tracking of user activity on Apple apps, regardless of the user's preference. The suspicious activities were first highlighted by two security researchers using a jailbroken iPhone.
The Indian government published the Digital Personal Data Protection draft, a highly anticipated proposal for a federal privacy law Another bill was introduced to the Parliament earlier this year and later withdrawn.
A class action was filed in a California federal court against GitHub's Copilot project. Proponents of the class action protest that Copilot's generative AI reproduces snippets of code with no attribution to the original developer, thus infringing open-source license terms.
In a yet unpublished decision, the Hungarian data protection authority (NAIH) ruled against the use of Google Analytics over data transfer concerns, following the example set by the Austrian, French, and Italian DPA's.
On November 8, a Committee of inquiry of the European Parliament published a report on the use of spyware by European Governments, painting a drab picture of State surveillance. Shortly after the report was published, the European Data Protection Supervisor called for a general ban on military-grade spyware.
New privacy apps

Mozilla is working with The Bergamot Project Consortium to develop Firefox Translations. Funded by EU's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program. News article.
Every day Tweet Sweeper automatically deletes your old tweets, so you can show off the current you.
Beacon is the most secure way to find family and friends on a map. No ads. No data selling. No tracking. All location data is end-to-end encrypted to ensure privacy.
Proton Calendar for iPhone is now available for everyone. Take your schedule with you, while keeping it private.
News from Simple Analytics

The French Minister of Education clarified that French schools should not use Microsoft 365 and Google Workspace.
Take a closer look at the different legal bases you can use for processing data under the GDPR.
Baden-Württemberg State Commissioner criticized Biden's Executive Order on Data Transfers. Thereby implicating that a deal between the EU and US is still far away.
New features in Simple Analytics

We are developing goals that will enhance the events' dashboard. It's still a work in progress, so here is a sneak peek just for you.

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That's it for this issue!

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